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Giving Tuesday | December 3, 2019


Giving Tuesday is December 3rd
, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, and we hope to inspire you to support our mission to create practical solutions at the intersection of vulnerability, migration, and health. MCN's proven programs are more needed than ever and our $15,000 fundraising goal will raise enough money to care for those on the move who face injustices every day.
  

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Across the globe, war, violence, economic uncertainty, climate crisis, discrimination, and poverty
are pushing more and more people to move.

As migration increases, we’re there, step by step, helping displaced people find their place.

 

Emergency Management: Puerto Rico

A bridge in Puerto Rico destroyed by Hurricane Maria

When Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico in 2017, thousands of people were cut off from basic services and necessities. Puerto Rico’s rural community health centers quickly stepped up to fill the void, acting as critical points of command in organizing and distributing aid, food, and clean water; overcoming communication and transportation infrastructure breakdown to communicate with neighboring communities; and serving the health needs of their communities despite interruptions in medicine and electricity. These efforts build community resiliency and support networks, which in turn prevents displacement by making communities safe.

MCN, with support from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, created the project “Mobilizing Communities in Puerto Rico to Meet the Needs of Vulnerable Populations Before, During, and After a Natural Disaster,” a multi-year effort that seeks to apply a community mobilization framework to emergency preparedness and to reinforce, replicate, and institutionalize the leadership efforts that community health centers showed after the disaster, in preparation for the next one.

“We’re going to reinforce what they have, give the community the capacity to prepare and manage disasters and emergencies with the resources that they already have, instead of relying on federal agencies’ responses, which was a major problem after Maria,” says Marysel Pagán-Santana, MS, DrPH, MCN's Program Manager in Puerto Rico. “We’re there to help facilitate, help [health centers] identify their resources, what they have and don’t have, to build a stronger network between them.”

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Health Network

Nelly Salgado works with Health Network Associates Robert Corona and Nestor Reyes, and Ventanilla de Salud Coordinator Roxana Pineda

Health Network, Migrant Clinicians Network’s unique bridge case management system, saves lives, hundreds of lives, every year. People like Phuong, a patient with tuberculosis who traveled back home to Vietnam in the midst of treatment, and Felicia, who stopped her treatment when she arrived in Central America, prompting a multi-agency international effort, led by Health Network, to help her get back to the doctor. In many cases, without Health Network, patients’ conditions would have worsened; for others, they would have died.

That’s because there is no other system like it. Health Network is the only case management system that provides assistance for people with any health condition moving to any location on the planet. What’s more, our culturally competent management system has been proven cost effective.

           “Health Network is saving lives everyday.” -- Mari Donaghy, Leroy E. Brown Medical Center           

“…the help from Health Network was all I had, I don’t know honestly what I would have done without it.”
-- Health Network prenatal patient

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Medical Review for Immigrants

A girl flexes her arms to show strength

Thousands of immigrants seeking asylum are arriving at the border each month. Our clinical network reports to us that many of these immigrants have urgent health needs that are going unmet. Exacerbated by a dangerous and long migration, often precipitated by years of toxic stress and traumatic events, and sometimes the direct result of violence in their homelands, these illnesses and injuries can be debilitating and deadly -- and they are too often overlooked while in detention. A 2018 Human Rights Watch report uncovered “subpar and dangerous practices” that constitute “systemic deficits in immigration detention facility health care.”

Medical Review for Immigrants (MRI) seeks to change that. The MCN initiative, launched in June 2018, links clinicians with pro-bono attorneys to get immigrants with urgent health needs out of detention and into care. MRI has already helped a dozen patients, like Maria*, who needed emergency surgery on her leg after being released from detention.

Through MRI, a physician is mobilized to quickly provide a Letter of Declaration for an attorney to request humanitarian parole for a seriously ill immigrant client, which enables the client to be released to receive essential care. Once released, MRI then assures that the client reaches the treatment she needs, with records transfer, follow-up services, and case management. MRI leans on MCN’s clinical network of over 10,000 constituents and over 35 years of experience working with health care providers coast to coast, and utilizes MCN’s Health Network, a proven cost-effective bridge case management system for patients who are moving while needing ongoing care.

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For over 35 years, MCN has been dedicated to the fight for health justice.
In 2020, we are all in, but we need your help to keep moving forward.

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