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Language and Translation

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Medicalspanish.com

This site holds many medical Spanish material, including a comprehensive medical Spanish dictionary, complete with audio.

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Spanish Language Resources for Staff

This website offers some free online lessons which teach basic Spanish concepts. More detailed and advanced lessons can be purchased on CDs from the website.

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Less Commonly Taught Language Project

The goal of this project is to create awareness about less common languages. This website offers a database of less commonly taught language classes, instructional materials, and other resources for teaching these languages. There are some resources for Zapoteco, Nahuatl, and Mayan indigenous languages.

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Isolated By Language: The Indigenous Oaxacans of Greenfield, CA

The town of Greenfield, CA has a high population of indigenous immigrants from Oaxaca, Mexico, many of whom speak little Spanish and/or English. This website is a compilation of work done by students from the UC,Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and reports on what the town of Greenfield is doing to improve communications and relations with these indigenous peoples

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MEJ Personal Business Services Inc., Global Language Solutions

M E J Personal Business Services, Inc. is an interpreting, translation, and financial service based in New York City.  They provide Foreign Language Interpreting, Telephone interpreting, video remote Interpreting, and Financial and Translation Services.  Their website specifies that they provide document translations in Mixteco.  

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Language Line

Language Line is a company which provides a number of interpretation services. One of their services is over-the-phone interpretation in Mixteco for $3.95 per minute. General information or questions:  1-877-886-3885 info@languageline.com

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Mixteco/Indigena Community Organizing Project (MICOP)

The MICOP is an organization of English,Spanish,and indigenous language speakers who are working to aid Oaxacan immigrants in Ventura County California. They mostly provide direct services. The“Necessities of Life” program distributes clothing, diapers, blankets, and other items to those in need. The organization also has programs which provide food, resources for medical care,education and literacy classes for adults, and weekly community meetings. Contact info: 325 W. ChannelIslands Blvd. Oxnard, California 93033 805) 385-8662

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Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas (CDI)

The CDI is an organization that was created in 2003 to ensure that indigenous communities and people in Mexico have the rights guaranteed to them by the Mexican Constitution. It collaborates with state governments and federal dependencies to evaluate current strategies and works to form new programs that will ensure equality and fight against indigenous discrimination. It also works to help indigenous peoples to improve their quality of life.

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Radio Bilingüe

Radio Bilingüe is a Spanish language network on public radio.  Although it is mostly California based, there are affiliate stations in Carrboro, Asheville, and Greenville, North Carolina.  There is also a radio program broadcast in Mixteco called La Hora Mixteca.

 

Contact: Filemón López, Coordinator of La Hora Mixteca

lopez.f@radiobilingue.org

(559) 455-5784

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Frente Indígena Oaxaqueño Binacional (FIOB)

The Oaxacan Indigenous Binational Front (FIOB) is a non-profit organization based in California. It is a coalition of indigenous organizations, communities, and individuals from Oaxaca, Baja California and in the State of California. This organization works to empower the indigenous peoples of Oaxaca and make sure that human rights are upheld for these communities in both Mexico and the United States.

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