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How to De-escalate a Tense Interaction

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Images of the featured resources

Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

English brochure preview

This almost real-time map shows where COVID-19 cases have been reported, all over the world, which provides some perspective and allows for a visual understanding of the spread as it progresses. 

NACHC’s new FAQ runs down a number of additional resources not covered here, specifically tailored for health centers. 

HRSA’s new COVID-19 FAQs give some overview on the health center requirements around emergency preparedness as well as recommendations for communications from health centers.

 

This new poll, taken by Migrant Clinicians Network in January and February 2018, reflected the experiences of clinical staff from 26 states across the country. Respondents came from every corner of the clinic; occupations listed include Physician, Executive Director, Dental Assistant, Outreach Specialist, Therapist, Community Health Worker, Registered Nurse, and 24 other occupations. The poll follows up on MCN’s 2017 poll, in which 63 percent of respondents indicated that immigrant and mobile patients’ attitudes and feelings toward health care access had changed.

This new poll, taken by Migrant Clinicians Network in January and February 2018, reflected the experiences of clinical staff from 26 states across the country. Respondents came from every corner of the clinic; occupations listed include Physician, Executive Director, Dental Assistant, Outreach Specialist, Therapist, Community Health Worker, Registered Nurse, and 24 other occupations. The poll follows up on MCN’s 2017 poll, in which 63 percent of respondents indicated that immigrant and mobile patients’ attitudes and feelings toward health care access had changed.

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"The Global Report on Internal Displacement presents the latest information on internal displacement worldwide caused by conflict, violence and disasters."

California's Medical Supervision Program is a biomonitoring program that measures cholinesterase activity in bloog samples from agricultural workers. Employers are required by law to contract with physicians who have registered for this program, all of whom are included in this list.

 

Safety and Health Practices
for Nail Salon Workers

Safety and Health Practicesfor Nail Salon Workers and a Training Guide for Nail Salon Worker Safety and Health Outreach Program

 

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Includes EPA manual "How to Comply With the 2015 Revised Worker Protection Standard For Agricultural Pesticides - What Owners and Employers Need To Know" and an excerpt specifically for clininicians regarding medical evaluation and respirator fit test. See also the medical evaluation questions in English and Spanish.  

This 90-minute webinar was created for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who treat and case manage patients with active TB.  The webinar introduced the 2016 Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.  This training highlighted the guidelines development process, the key changes in recommendations, and discussed the evidence supporting the changes.  The webinar was originally presented on November 4, 2016. This training was jointly sponsored by all 5 RTMCCs.

mcn comic book working with farm animals

Bilingual educational comic book about ways to prevent zoonotic diseases. Developed by MCN in partnership with The Ohio State University.

MCN Clinician Guides

MCN and Farmworker Justice offer these guides to assist clinicians in understanding farmworker health and safety regulations. OSHA’s Field Sanitation Standard; EPA's Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); EPA's  Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA); EPA’s Worker Protection Standard (WPS).

The 1999–2013 United States Cancer Statistics (USCS): Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report includes the official federal statistics on cancer incidence from registries that have high-quality data, and cancer mortality statistics. It is produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This report shows that in 2013, 1,536,119 Americans received a new diagnosis of invasive cancer, and 584,872 Americans died of this disease (these counts do not include in situ cancers or the more than 1 million cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancers diagnosed each year).

This year’s report features information on invasive cancer cases diagnosed during 2013, the most recent year of incidence data available, among residents of 49 states, six metropolitan areas, and the District of Columbia—geographic areas in which about 99% of the U.S. population resides. Incidence data are from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Data from population-based central cancer registries in these states and metropolitan areas meet the criteria for inclusion in this report.

The report also provides cancer mortality data collected and processed by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. Mortality statistics, based on records of deaths that occurred during 2013, are available for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The report also includes incidence rates and counts for Puerto Rico for 2009 through 2013 by sex and age, as well brain tumor and childhood cancer data.

USCS data are presented in the following applications—

 

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

 

DATE RECORDED: June 8, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Worker Protection Standard (WPS) provides basic workplace protections to farmworkers and pesticide handlers to minimize the adverse effects of pesticide exposure. EPA announced major revisions to the WPS in September 2015. MCN and FJ's fact sheet provides a summary of the revised regulation.

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In 2015, for the first time in over 20 years, the Environmental Protection Agency updated the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). The WPS provides basic workplace protections for agricultural workers to reduce the risk of pesticide exposre. This issue brief overviews the major revisions that are particularly relevant for clinicians caring for agricultural workers. 

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mcn five on friday

 

ACA Toolkit:

Available in English and Spanish

Health Insurance Guide:

Available in English and Spanish and Haitian Creole

 

 

Older Guides:

Available in EnglishSpanish, and Haitian Creole for workers on employer-provided health insurance

 

Created by Farmworker Justice.

The National LGBT Health Education Center provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

http://www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org/

ADAO is the largest independent nonprofit in the U.S. dedicated to preventing asbestos exposure, eliminating asbestos-related diseases, and protecting asbestos victims' civil rights through education, advocacy, and community initiatives. 

This new guide from the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership is intended to help civil legal aid practitioners message their work to health care audiences in order to build stronger cross sector medical-legal partnerships and to encourage investment in that work.

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On Monday August 18, 2014 MCN submitted technical comments to the EPA regarding the proposed changes to the Worker Protection Standard.  View MCN's recommendations for advancing stronger safeguards to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure. 

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This proposal will I) provide a profile of the agricultural industry and Farmworkers in Washington State II) propose a theoretical framework to understand farmworker housing accessibility III) describe prior legislative actions to address farmworker housing IV) and propose a set of recommendations to address farmworker housing.

This report captures important happenings in occupational health and safety from August 2013 through July 2014. Authoured by researchers from the George Washington University Milken Institute School Of Public Health, this resource focuses on workplace injury and illness statistics each spring and documents successes, challenges, and areas ripe for improvement in occupational health and safety.  

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