Skip to main content
x

Low impact disclosure

Download Resource

Applying the witnessing model to George Floyd's Murder

Haitian Creole Flow charts

Steps For an Organization to Consider When Addressing Conflict

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

Leer en espanol button

Anger amidst care resource

Download Resource

Haitian Creole  

Images of the featured resources

Download Resource

Leer en espanol button

A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

Download Resource

Leer en espanol button

How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

Leer en espanol button

 

Healthy Sleep Tips

Download Resource

Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

English brochure preview

2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

Download Resource

The New England Journal of Medicine has an article analyzing early cases in China which gives some clarity around how the virus works: “Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China".

The CDC’s archived webinar from last week provides a useful overview for clinicians: “Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update—What Clinicians Need to Know to Prepare for COVID-19 in the United States.”

This almost real-time map shows where COVID-19 cases have been reported, all over the world, which provides some perspective and allows for a visual understanding of the spread as it progresses. 

NACHC’s new FAQ runs down a number of additional resources not covered here, specifically tailored for health centers. 

HRSA’s new COVID-19 FAQs give some overview on the health center requirements around emergency preparedness as well as recommendations for communications from health centers.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: April 11, 2019, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA  |  Alma R Galvan, MHC  |  Jose Rodriguez, MD  |  Katherine Kruse, BA

 

 

Description

Joe and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Resources on diabetes-care programs including the topics: about diabetes, type 1 diabetes, healthy eating, and blood sugar. Available in Spanish and English.

 

This new poll, taken by Migrant Clinicians Network in January and February 2018, reflected the experiences of clinical staff from 26 states across the country. Respondents came from every corner of the clinic; occupations listed include Physician, Executive Director, Dental Assistant, Outreach Specialist, Therapist, Community Health Worker, Registered Nurse, and 24 other occupations. The poll follows up on MCN’s 2017 poll, in which 63 percent of respondents indicated that immigrant and mobile patients’ attitudes and feelings toward health care access had changed.

This new poll, taken by Migrant Clinicians Network in January and February 2018, reflected the experiences of clinical staff from 26 states across the country. Respondents came from every corner of the clinic; occupations listed include Physician, Executive Director, Dental Assistant, Outreach Specialist, Therapist, Community Health Worker, Registered Nurse, and 24 other occupations. The poll follows up on MCN’s 2017 poll, in which 63 percent of respondents indicated that immigrant and mobile patients’ attitudes and feelings toward health care access had changed.

Download Resource

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

California's Medical Supervision Program is a biomonitoring program that measures cholinesterase activity in bloog samples from agricultural workers. Employers are required by law to contract with physicians who have registered for this program, all of whom are included in this list.

"Coccidioidomycosis or Valley Fever is an infectious disease in parts of the U.S.A. It is caused by inhaling microscopic arthroconidia (also known as arthrospores or spores) of the closely related fungal species Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. Areas where Coccidioides is endemic (native and common) include states in the southwestern U.S.A. such as Arizona, California, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas, and Utah and parts of Mexico, Central America and South America."

 

Safety and Health Practices
for Nail Salon Workers

Safety and Health Practicesfor Nail Salon Workers and a Training Guide for Nail Salon Worker Safety and Health Outreach Program

 

Download Resource

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.