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Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: May 24, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

​José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Tomato Workers Health Guide

 

Available in English and Spanish!

 

Created by MCN, medical student Rachel Kelley of UCSF, and collaborators at East Tennessee State University, this guide is intended to be a reference for health care providers who work with people employed in the U.S. tomato industry. It aims to prepare providers with a more detailed understanding of hazards, health issues, and work processes associated with different tomato industry jobs.

This guide draws on published research, experienced health professionals’ advice, and information gathered from interviews and focus groups conducted with 36 tomato workers from diverse backgrounds and 14 community leaders familiar with tomato workers’ health in multiple states. It is important to note that health and safety conditions at any particular farm or company may vary from what is described here. Furthermore, individual workers may experience the same set of conditions differently.

The first section of the guide focuses on health hazards and health conditions commonly encountered in tomato production. The second section consists of detailed descriptions and illustrations of different tomato production tasks. The third section covers “human resources” information and policies that apply to U.S. agricultural workers generally. The appendices contain a Spanish-English glossary, further detail about different types of pesticides, information about agricultural occupational health policies and regulation, and a list of resources and readings.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: August 17, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Amy Liebman, MPA, MA and Wilson Augustave, member of MCN’s Board of Directors and Senior HIV Case Manager at Finger Lakes Community Health

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers.   

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
    Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
    Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
    Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 15, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Dra. Maura Patricia García Castillo, MD, MPH

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CNE or CHW (for Texas) credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

This webinar will provide an in-depth look at social determinants of health, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the interactions between the two.  Social determinants, including economic stability, access to education, access to healthy natural environments, and socioeconomic conditions like high levels of poverty in the community, are associated with early-onset cardiovascular disease. The webinar will also address the most common cardiovascular conditions among underserved populations.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the social determinants of health
  2. Recognize cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors
  3. Understand how the social determinants of health influence cardiovascular disease risk factors
  4. Learn strategies for prevention and intervention to limit the impact of these social determinants
Further Reading

MCN

 

 

DATE RECORDED: June 8, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Ver en Español

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: May 25, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Antonio Tovar, PhD

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Worker Protection Standard (WPS) provides basic workplace protections to farmworkers and pesticide handlers to minimize the adverse effects of pesticide exposure. EPA announced major revisions to the WPS in September 2015. MCN and FJ's fact sheet provides a summary of the revised regulation.

Download Resource

In 2015, for the first time in over 20 years, the Environmental Protection Agency updated the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). The WPS provides basic workplace protections for agricultural workers to reduce the risk of pesticide exposre. This issue brief overviews the major revisions that are particularly relevant for clinicians caring for agricultural workers. 

Download Resource

Ver en español

MCN Webinar

DATE RECORDED: March 30, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Ileana Ponce-González, MD, MPH

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Webinar Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers. 

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

DATE RECORDED: Friday, July 11
PRESENTED BY: Ed Zuroweste, MD. Chief Medical Officer, Migrant Clinicians Network

Webinar banner
View Recorded Webinar   Participant Evaluation

EOH icon

 

MCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

Migrant workers are often employed in some of the most dangerous jobs in the United States. Lack of training, poor safety precautions, regulatory exclusions, lack of health insurance, language barriers, piece-rate pay, undocumented worker status, and geographical and cultural isolation can put these workers at increased risk for occupationally related injuries and illnesses and chronic sequelae.  

This webinar will discuss health risks facing migrants as a result of their working conditions and highlight best practices and resources to incorporate environmental and work-related health into the primary care setting.  It will aslo showcase successful initiatives employed in Community and Migrant Health Centers.  Participants will become familiar with the importance of and feasible approaches to integrate environmental and occupational health into primary care from both a clinical and social justice perspective.

 

SPONSORED BY: Migrant Clinicians Network

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the reasons for integratin environmental and occupational health into primary care
  2. Recognize the role of the clinician in work-related exposure
  3. Be familiar with tools and resources to address occupational injuries and exposures in primary care

 


CLINICAL TOOLS & RESOURCES



PATIENT EDUCATION MATERIALS



ARCHIVED WEBINARS & TRAINING RESOURCES


DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, June 17, 2014
PRESENTED BY: Matthew Keifer, MD, MPH, Dean Emanuel Endowed Chair/Director National Farm Medicine Center

Webinar: Pesticide poisonings. Are you prepared?
View Recorded WebinarParticipant Evaluation

EOH iconMCN’s Environmental and Occupational Health Programs

Learn more about MCN’s training and technical assistance programs to help clinicians and health centers improve the recognition and management of pesticide exposures and other environmental/occupational health conditions.

 

Mistakes can be dangerous. Accurate identification of pesticides responsible for a patient's illness is important to avoid iatrogenic errors with respect to acute treatment.  Join us for an important webinar that will focus on key decision points in the diagnosis of pesticide exposures and emphasize the usefulness of the newly revised resource for clinicians - The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed.  Through interactive case studies, this webinar will illustrate effective recognition and treatment of patients over exposed to pesticides. 


The webinar, sponsored by Migrant Clinicians Network, the National Farm Medicine Center and AgriSafe Network features Dr. Keifer, a board certified occupational medicine specialist and internationally renowned researcher regarding pesticides and agricultural health and safety. For over 30 years, Dr. Keifer has focused his clinical practice and research largely on farmworkers. 

SPONSORED BY: AgriSafe Network, Migrant Clinicians Network, and the National Farm Medicine Center

OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to:

  1. Better recognize the signs and symptoms of pesticide overexposure
  2. Identify key decision points in diagnosing pesticide exposures
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. in a clinical setting

We encourage all participants to order The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 6th ed. prior to attending this webinar. Order here. PDF versions are also available at http://www2.epa.gov/pesticide-worker-safety/recognition-and-management-pesticide-poisonings
If you have experienced any trouble ordering your copy please contact: kbrennan@migrantclinician.org 

 

 


CLINICAL TOOLS & RESOURCES



PATIENT EDUCATION MATERIALS



ARCHIVED WEBINARS & TRAINING RESOURCES



LOCAL PESTICIDE RESOURCES


The following will provide information regarding the pesticides used in your areas:

Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals.  The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Ostetricicans and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic envrionmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure.

Download Resource

Part 4 of 7 webinars in the CLINICIAN ORIENTATION TO MIGRATION HEALTH series.

DATE RECORDED: May 15, 2013

PRESENTERS: Amy K. Leibman, MPA, MA, Director of Environmental and Occupational Health, Migrant Clinicians Network

Dr. Mike Rowland, MD, MPH, Vice President, Medical Affairs and Medical Director, Occupational Health, Franklin Memorial Hospital

OBJECTIVES:

  • Recognize the unique health risks of migrants due to their working conditions and environment
  • Identify promising practices in environmental and occupational health that are feasible to implement in Migrant and Community Health Centers
  • Utilize online clinical and patient education tools and resources to recognize, prevent and manage environmental and occupaional illnesses and injuries
Download Resource

This webinar is the third in a series of seven in our Clinician Orienatation to Migration Health.

DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, April 17, 2013
PRESENTED BY: Edward Zuroweste, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Migrant Clinicians Network

To view the recorded version of this webinar, click here.

Download Resource

This webinar is the first in a series of seven in our Clinician Orienatation to Migration Health.

DATE RECORDED: Wednesday, February 13, 2013
PRESENTED BY: Deliana Garcia, MA, International Research and Development, Migrant Clinicians Network

To view the recorded version of this webinar, click here.

Download Resource

Presentations by Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (PNASH): 

 

1. Age Considerations: Impacts on Pesticide Exposure and Health Outcomes

2. How to Identify the Products Your Patients are Exposed to

3. Reporting, Surveillance, Legal Aspects of Pesticide Related Illnesses

4. The Work to Home Pesticide Exposure Pathway: How to Protect Pregnant Women and Children (English and Spanish)

5. Chronic Health Effects of Pesticide Exposure

The importance of clinical diagnostic tools and biomonitoring of exposures to pesticides as well the role of clinicians in pesticide reporting and the challenges clinicians face in accurately diagnosing patients exposed to pesticides are described in a presentation by Matthew Keifer, MD, MPH and Amy K. Liebman, MPA. Click on the link for an APHA policy resolution underscoring the need for clinical diagnostic tools and biomomitoring of exposures to pesticides. This policy supports the information outlined by in the presentation.

This is an MCN online course.  The primary objective is to ensure clinicians serving migrant and underserved communities are aware of general childhood agricultural safety and health concerns. This will be accomplished in a way that increases the clinicians’ ability to provide effective healthcare to their patients by assessing and understanding agricultural health risks.

An MCN/CDN webcast facilitated by Candace Kugel, FNP, CNM

HEAT ILLNESS CAN BE DEADLY. Every year, thousands of workers become sick from exposure to heat, and some even die. These illnesses and deaths are preventable.

OSHA has now posted a new Heat Illness Web Page that includes educational materials in English and Spanish, including low-literacy fact sheets for workers, worksite and community posters, and a public service announcement from Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis.  The Web page also includes a video from Assistant Secretary Dr. David Michaels (in English with a Spanish transcript).  OSHA will be posting additional materials on the Heat Illness Web page, including a lesson plan that employers can use to train their workers to stay safe in the heat and a heat index Smartphone app. 

Matthew Keifer, MD, MPH, a board certified occupational medicine specialist and internationally renowned researcher regarding pesticides and worker health, overviews the importance of recognizing and managing pesticide exposure.  To obtain free CME* credit, please complete this evaluation at the end of the webinar http://www.migrantclinician.org/national_webinar_eval. Sponsored by AgriSafe Network, Migrant Clinicians Network and the National Farm Medicine Center.

*Application for CME credit has been filed with the American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending.

 Introductory overview of occupational health policy by Farmworker Justice.

Download Resource

This hour long webcast features Jennie McLaurin, MD, MPH – a former medical director of a migrant and community health center and a pediatrician with over 20 years of practice serving farmworker and immigrant populations.

 

An interactive lead case study by Susan Buchanan, MD, Linda Forst, MD, MPH, and Anne Evens, MS.

The AgriSafe Network Distance Learning Webinars aims to provide appropriate and timely training opportunities for Network members and affiliates. Through partnering with the National Rural Health Association and the Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health, the Network has been able to offer a series of fantastic speakers using the web-based Elluminate program.

This CME/CE course by Sussan K. Sutphen, MD, MEd offers an excellent overview about water and sanitation disease.