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Worker Protection Standard Pesticide Safety Training Curriculum - Culturally and linguistically appropriate  curriculum with supporting resources for training workers on the revised Worker Protection Standard. Developed by the Florida State University PISCA Project and Migrant Clinicians Network.  

Tomato Workers Health Guide

 

Available in English and Spanish!

 

Created by MCN, medical student Rachel Kelley of UCSF, and collaborators at East Tennessee State University, this guide is intended to be a reference for health care providers who work with people employed in the U.S. tomato industry. It aims to prepare providers with a more detailed understanding of hazards, health issues, and work processes associated with different tomato industry jobs.

This guide draws on published research, experienced health professionals’ advice, and information gathered from interviews and focus groups conducted with 36 tomato workers from diverse backgrounds and 14 community leaders familiar with tomato workers’ health in multiple states. It is important to note that health and safety conditions at any particular farm or company may vary from what is described here. Furthermore, individual workers may experience the same set of conditions differently.

The first section of the guide focuses on health hazards and health conditions commonly encountered in tomato production. The second section consists of detailed descriptions and illustrations of different tomato production tasks. The third section covers “human resources” information and policies that apply to U.S. agricultural workers generally. The appendices contain a Spanish-English glossary, further detail about different types of pesticides, information about agricultural occupational health policies and regulation, and a list of resources and readings.

Chapter 14: Pesticides Are Poison from the Hesperian.org health guide: A Community Guide to Environmental Health.

Read the English version here.

Read the Spanish version here.

mcn comic book working with farm animals

Bilingual educational comic book about ways to prevent zoonotic diseases. Developed by MCN in partnership with The Ohio State University.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN Webinar Examining Asthma at Work

 

DATE RECORDED: September 14, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H.

 

  • Recorded Webinar
  • Participant Evaluation
  • Presentation Slides (PDF)

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Ricardo is a 35 year old man from Oaxaca, Mexico who mixes flour and other ingredients to make pizza at a local restaurant. In the last five years he has experienced progressive wheezing, cough and shortness of breath at work. Laboratory testing suggests new-onset asthma caused by flour dust. Ricardo is unable to return to his job and has filed for workers compensation.

This is an important issue for all workers, but especially for vulnerable workers who may work in industries with conditions that exacerbate asthma symptoms. This includes janitorial workers, farmworkers, and those working in meat processing plants. An estimated 40% of adults with asthma report that work has caused or aggravated the condition, yet only 28% have discussed their concerns about work with their doctor. Health care providers should be aware of the approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this condition. This interactive webinar will use case studies to discuss the link between work and asthma. It will also equip clinicians with the tools necessary to identify and manage work-related asthma with a particular emphasis on vulnerable workers and strategies for mitigating their unique challenges.

Learning Objectives
  1. Understand the link between asthma and the work environment
  2. Identify strategies for recognizing and managing work-related asthma
  3. Familiarize yourself with the clinical resources related to work-related asthma
Further Reading
  • Coming soon

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: August 17, 2016 at 1 pm ET

PRESENTED BY: Amy Liebman, MPA, MA and Wilson Augustave, member of MCN’s Board of Directors and Senior HIV Case Manager at Finger Lakes Community Health

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

Milton “Tito” Rafael Barreto Hernandez was 22 years old when he died. He was killed when he was pulled into a machine at the concrete crushing facility where he worked.  This work-related death could have been prevented and would likely never have happened had the right safety procedures been followed.  Low-wage workers like Tito often work in dangerous jobs and immigrants are more likely to die or get hurt at work.  In spite of dangers on the job, all workers have the right to a safe and healthy workplace. This training for community health workers will equip you with the knowledge you need to empower people to advocate for their rights on the job. Additionally, participants will come to understand how to seek help in case of a dangerous work environment and to be familiar with resources to assist workers.   

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
    Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
    Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
    Identify worker safety and health rights and responsibilities in the United States
  2. Describe the role of government agencies in protecting workers
  3. Recognize resources to assist workers in addressing workplace hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

DATE RECORDED: June 22, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Kerry Brennan

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

José Navarro was excited for his new career after landing a job in the poultry industry. After five years on the job, 37 year-old Navarro began coughing up blood. He died soon after when his lungs and kidneys failed. His death triggered a federal investigation raising questions about the health risks associated with the use of toxic chemicals in poultry plants.

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

MCN

 

 

DATE RECORDED: June 8, 2016

PRESENTED BY: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org
Description

It was 95 degrees when Maria Jimenez, 17 years old, collapsed from heat exhaustion at a farm in California. She died two days later. Each year, nearly 30 workers die from heat-related illness in the United States. Outdoor work in labor-intensive industries poses serious risks for workers, but heat-related illness can be easily prevented.

This workshop will help community health workers recognize and prevent heat-related illness among at-risk workers. Case studies will show how to recognize the symptoms and health effects of heat-related illness. Participants in this workshop will receive resources for preventing heat-related illness.

Learning Objectives
  1. Recognize symptoms of heat-related illness and how to respond
  2. Identify steps workers can take to prevent heat-related illness
  3. Review employer and worker rights and responsibilities related to heat stress
  4. Become familiar with heat stress prevention resources
Further Reading

This material will be produced under grant number SH-27640-15-60-F-48-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It will not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

http://www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org/

ADAO is the largest independent nonprofit in the U.S. dedicated to preventing asbestos exposure, eliminating asbestos-related diseases, and protecting asbestos victims' civil rights through education, advocacy, and community initiatives. 

These bilingual posters educate workers on how to work safely with machinery on the farm.  Developed by two Occupational Health Interns (OHIP) during their internship with the National Farm Medicine Center, these posters accompany the Seguridad en las Lecherías curriculum.

Download Resource

MCN's Bilingual Picture Dictionary, "Seguridad en Palabras/ Safety in Words," illustrates work place hazards and best practices for health and safety in agriculture.  Developed with support from the OSHA Susan Harwood Grant Program, this resource will bolster Hispanic workers' English vocabulary and will help prevent agricultural injuries. 

Download Resource

 

A bilingual, full-color comic book about workers' compensation and workers' rights for immigrant dairy workers. It tells the story of a Mexican dairy worker injured on the job and the steps he and his employer take to ensure he receives benefits and the farm improves safety. These include stories that are applicable across the U.S. and those that are state specific.

 


¡Cuídate! is a patient education resource aimed at preventing musculoskeletal injuries among farmworkers. The comic book is available in English, Spanish and Creole.

MCN Spanish educational comic book that addresses pesticide exposure in women of reproductive age. LO QUE BIEN EMPIEZA...BIEN ACABA: Consejos para las mujeres para prevenir daños a la salud y a sus bebés causados por pesticidas.

Download Resource

Use the link below to access MCN's Rapid Assessment Tool to help adolescent farmworkers identify agricultural tasks they perform in agriculture and facilitate clinician understanding about the health risks associated with it.  Youth worker images are adapted and reproduced with permission from the National Children Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. Images copyrighted through Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin.

If computers and internet access are unavailable where patient care is provided, the worker assessment sheet and clinician information grid are available in PDF.

HEAT ILLNESS CAN BE DEADLY. Every year, thousands of workers become sick from exposure to heat, and some even die. These illnesses and deaths are preventable.

OSHA has now posted a new Heat Illness Web Page that includes educational materials in English and Spanish, including low-literacy fact sheets for workers, worksite and community posters, and a public service announcement from Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis.  The Web page also includes a video from Assistant Secretary Dr. David Michaels (in English with a Spanish transcript).  OSHA will be posting additional materials on the Heat Illness Web page, including a lesson plan that employers can use to train their workers to stay safe in the heat and a heat index Smartphone app. 

https://www3.marshfieldclinic.org/nccrahs/default.aspx?page=nfmc_nccrahs_saghaf 

Seven guidelines in English and Spanish. Colorful, illustrated poster address supervisor responsibilities for ensuring work conditions are appropriate and adequate . Training and supervision tips, specific to teens and to each job, are provided. Developed by National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety.

http://www.nagcat.org/nagcat/default.aspx?page=nagcat_guidelines_posters

Guidelines for parents to match child's growth and development with the requirements of different farm chores in order to lessen the risk of farm related disease or injury in children and teenagers. North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks was developed by the National Children's Center for Rural Agricultural Health and Safety.

OSHA facts sheet and guidance for commercial swine farmers and pork producers.  Bilingual "quick card" to assist with worker protection. 

 

 

 

 

California Department of Public Health, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control has identified several cases of mercury toxicity linked to the use of adulterated, unlabelled face creams in the Latino community.  

A bilingual training kit for community health workers to educate families about in home pesticide safety.  Includes a step-by-step facilitator guide with handouts and a power point slide slow.  Developed by the Center for Environmental Resource Management at UTEP for US-Mexico border residents.

 

Un paquete bilingue para ayudar a trabajadores comunitarios de la salud a educar familias sobre la forma segura de usar pesticidas en el hogar.  Hay instrucciones paso a paso, los materiales para distribuir y la presentación para mostrarse estan disponibles en Español. Estas pláticas se enfocan a los residentes de la frontera EU-México y fue realizado por el Centro para la Administración de Recursos Ambientales de la Universidad de Texas en El Paso.

Photonovelas in English and Spanish. Produced by the North Carolina Farmworker Project.

The CA Department of Pesticide Regulation provides videos in Mixteco about pesticide safety. Contact Charlene Martens to get copies or more information: (916) 445-4261 cmartens@cdpr.ca.gov

Educational comic book about the sources of indoor pollution and ways to minimize exposure. Offers safe alternatives to clean homes. English and Spanish.


This pesticide comic book targets migrant and seasonal farmworker families to educate parents about children's risks to pesticide exposure and ways to minimize these risks. The latest edition is currently only available Spanish though we are working on releasing an updated version of the comic in English.

We are currently "sold out" of our printed pesticide comic book. We are looking for additional funding. In the meantime, please download an e-copy.

A Spanish language trifold with pesticide safety information.

Download Resource

A Spanish language comic books that explains the dangers of pesticides and offers practical, less toxic approaches to pest control. Produced by the Center for Environmental Resource Management at UTEP.