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Low impact disclosure

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Juan Abre los Ojos

Applying the witnessing model to George Floyd's Murder

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Haitian Creole Flow charts

Steps For an Organization to Consider When Addressing Conflict

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

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Anger amidst care resource

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Haitian Creole  

Images of the featured resources

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

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Healthy Sleep Tips

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Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

English brochure preview

2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

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Worker Protection Standard Pesticide Safety Training Curriculum - Culturally and linguistically appropriate  curriculum with supporting resources for training workers on the revised Worker Protection Standard. Developed by the Florida State University PISCA Project and Migrant Clinicians Network.

The New England Journal of Medicine has an article analyzing early cases in China which gives some clarity around how the virus works: “Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China".

The CDC’s archived webinar from last week provides a useful overview for clinicians: “Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update—What Clinicians Need to Know to Prepare for COVID-19 in the United States.”

This list of resources was selected because of the breadth of languages and the simplicity of the infographics. 

APHA's Get Ready campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies.

The Hesperian provides excellent patient education material on COVID-19 in a number of languagues for use internationally or with immigrant communiites in the United Sates. 

My Health is My Treasure

Diabetes is a common but complicated health condition facing agricultural workers within the United States. To help assist agricultural workers in learning about this diagnosis, Migrant Clinicians Network has partnered with professional artist and collaborator Salvador Sáenz to create “Mi salud es mi tesoro: Un guía para vivir bien con diabetes,” or, “My Health is My Treasure: A Guide to Living Well with Diabetes.” This low-literacy comic book explores the topic through the full-color story of an agricultural farmworker named Goyo, whose recent diagnosis of diabetes prompts him to engage in conversations with other agricultural workers on topics of diet, exercise, and illness prevention while facing the unique hurdles of living a life of migration. The comic book was originally produced in Spanish, and is now available in English below. Please click "Leer en español" above to access the Spanish-language version. 

In order to print the right number of comic books, we are asking organizations to pre-order in quantities up to 500. The comic book and shipping will be paid for by MCN. In exchange, we simply ask that you, or someone from your organization, complete an evaluation of the comic book several months after you first receive it. Information from the evaluation will help us improve our resources and will give us important insight into how the comic book is being used in the community.

Download a digital copy of the comic book below!

These Spanish and English cholesterol patient education resources were developed by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the School of Public Health, El Paso Regional Campus. The artwork was done by Salvador Saenz, a well-known and respected public health educator and artist based in El Paso, TX

These Spanish and English hypertension patient education resources were developed by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the School of Public Health, Ele Paso Regional Campus. The artwork was done by Salvador Saenz, a well-known and respected public health educator and artist based in El Paso, TX. 

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: April 11, 2019, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA  |  Alma R Galvan, MHC  |  Jose Rodriguez, MD  |  Katherine Kruse, BA

 

 

Description

Joe and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.