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Haitian Creole Flow charts

Steps For an Organization to Consider When Addressing Conflict

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

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Anger amidst care resource

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A Daily Practice to Restore Equanimity

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How to Re-establish Safety When You Have been Jolted into a Stress Response

Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine Trifold

Pregnancy and the COVID-19 Vaccine brochure OUTSIDE

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Healthy Sleep Tips

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Questions for staff to address current organizational tensions

This publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $ 1,310,460 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

Vaccines, Masks, and the Delta Variant Handout

2021 Heat Related illness Clinicians Guide

Agricultural workers are at significant risk for heat stress. Heat stress results when the body cannot get rid of excess heat and its core temperature rises.  Heat stress may lead to more severe heat illness including heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat stroke, and even death if left untreated.  Agricultural work, which requires performing physically demanding work for long hours in hot and sometimes humid weather, places workers at high risk.

This guide provides information to clinicians on the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness. Since workers may not be familiar with all of the symptoms of heat stress, it is important that clinicians discuss heat illness symptoms and prevention with agricultural workers and others who are at risk.

 


This joint FJ and MCN publication was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of awards totaling $1,949,598 with 0% financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HHS.gov.

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The New England Journal of Medicine has an article analyzing early cases in China which gives some clarity around how the virus works: “Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China".

The CDC’s archived webinar from last week provides a useful overview for clinicians: “Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update—What Clinicians Need to Know to Prepare for COVID-19 in the United States.”

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: April 11, 2019, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA  |  Alma R Galvan, MHC  |  Jose Rodriguez, MD  |  Katherine Kruse, BA

 

 

Description

Joe and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at their worksite ready for the day’s work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. It didn’t take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting. Soon his world was spinning and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and has resulted in at least 17 worker deaths between the years 2000 and 2015.
Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals every day on the job. In 2016, the UN estimated that a worker dies from toxic exposure in their workplace every 30 seconds, leading to a total of 2.8 million worker deaths worldwide within the past year.  In the US, all workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This webinar will offer community health workers training on how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Resources on diabetes-care programs including the topics: about diabetes, type 1 diabetes, healthy eating, and blood sugar. Available in Spanish and English.

Application Deadline: 04/15/2018 at 5 pm CST

The Underserved Occupational Populations Section of ACOEM is sponsoring one $1,000 scholarship to qualified residents and medical students interested in making significant contributions to the field of underserved occupational medicine.The scholarship was established in honor of Joseph A. Fortuna, MD, FACOEM who founded the Underserved Occupational Populations Section of ACOEM and who was a tireless supporter of underserved workers and their families.

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"The Global Report on Internal Displacement presents the latest information on internal displacement worldwide caused by conflict, violence and disasters."

"These materials are designed to be simple and useful in helping physicians and health-care professionals to meet the needs of their patients who may be undocumented or suffering stresses related to close family or community members being undocumented.  While there are many toolkits being developed, we hope that these materials might be very easy to use and enable the physician or other health-care professional to address the most immediate needs of such patients."

MCN webinar It’s your right to know! Helping Community Health Workers Promote Chemical Safety on the Job

DATE: December 13, 2017, 1 pm (ET)

SPEAKERS: Juliana Simmons, MSPH, CHES and Amy K. Liebman, MPA, MA

 

 

Continuing Education Credit

To receive CME* or CNE credit after viewing this webinar, you must:

  • Complete the Participant Evaluation associated with this webinar
  • Send an email with your first and last name stating which webinar you completed to contedu@migrantclinician.org

 

Description

Jason and his crew of painters arrived at the​ir​ worksite ready for the day's work. The job at hand involved stripping paint in a small room and the boss said not to come out until the job was done. ​​It didn't take long before Jason began feeling dizzy and nauseous and then started vomiting.​ Soon his world was spinning​ and he was slipping in and out of consciousness. He looked to his coworkers and noticed them slumped on the ground. All three men had to be removed from the site and revived. Jason was lucky. The paint stripper his crew used contained methylene chloride, which is highly toxic and resulted in at least 13 worker deaths between 2000 and 2011. ​

Millions of workers are exposed to chemicals everyday on the job. All workers have the right to know about the chemicals they work with and community health workers can be an important source of information and support for workers. This workshop will teach community health workers how to explain what happens when someone is exposed to chemicals and how workers can best protect themselves.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how workers become exposed to chemicals and illnesses
  2. Describe basic safety practices when working around chemicals
  3. Understand the role of community health workers in identifying and preventing work related illnesses and hazards

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under cooperative agreement number U30CS09742, Technical Assistance to Community and Migrant Health Centers and Homeless for $1,094,709.00 with 0% of the total NCA project financed with non-federal sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Offers basic screening questions, common occupations and ailments associated with them, as well as recommended treatment. Also includes sample letters from clinicians to employers for restricted work.

This resource offers training for community based organizations and workers in the aftermath of natural disasters. It includes educational materials as well as trainer guides and tools.

Blog post from the U.S. Department of Labor highlighting common hazards during hurricane cleanup as well as links to additional readings.

Information on keeping food and water safe for consumption and best hygiene practices in the face of disasters.

Offers tips about potential hazards and protective strategies during disaster cleanup.

This page highlights important tools for clinicians as well as diagnoses to consider when caring for disaster-affected patients.

United for Puerto Rico is an initiative brought forth by the First Lady of Puerto Rico, Beatriz Rosselló, in collaboration with the private sector, with the purpose of providing aid and support to those affected in Puerto Rico by the passage of Hurricane Irma and Hurricane María. 100% of the proceeds will go to helping the victims afteced by these natural disasters in Puerto Rico.

This site includes various helpful links including information on health hazards, mold remediation, respirator use, and related policy information.

Safety Awareness for Responders to Hurricanes: Protecting Yourself While Helping Others in English and Spanish. This comprehensive guide to protective measures for cleanup workers covers a wide variety of potential hazards.